Woman trying to pry open a tired eyelid

10 Tips To Help Beat Your Psoriatic Arthritis Fatigue

Living with psoriatic arthritis can often make you feel tired and guilty. People used to say to me that the fatigue I was feeling was caused by my thoughts and my negativity. If you blame yourself as I did, it is time to stop and change your mindset. Fatigue is real and not our fault. In fact, fatigue is one of the many early symptoms of psoriatic arthritis.

Researchers believe fatigue may be linked to the large release of many chemicals caused by the chronic inflammation of the disease in the body.1 Although it’s not yet fully researched, it does seem that certain behaviors or changes in lifestyle can succeed in calming its intensity.

Tips for managing symptoms of psoriatic arthritis fatigue

If you have psoriatic arthritis, you may feel like you need to sleep all the time (like I do). There are a few simple changes that have boosted my energy and helped me feel better.

Food is always number one

Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables every day and reduce the number of saturated fats. Make your own home-cooked meals to avoid the additives from processed food. Increase your intake of group B vitamins to promote energy production.

Keep moving

Fatigue and low energy can be frustrating aspects of arthritis. By gradually increasing the intensity of your physical activities (even your household activities), you can increase your energy level, your endurance, and your mood. But first, you must consult with your doctor about which activities can help you gain strength and which ones you should avoid.

Forget about alcohol and smoking before bed

There is a reason why alcohol and smoking are considered vices. They can significantly increase your symptoms and interrupt your sleep.

Have a sleep discipline

It is not always easy to find restful sleep. But you can increase your chances of success; adopt a regular sleep schedule such as going to bed and get up at the same time every day and leave devices like laptops and cellphones outside the bedroom. This is a super hard one for me.

Hydrate yourself

Water helps regulate your body temperature, lubricate your joints, and eliminate waste. Drink plenty!

Stop eating late in the evening

Nighttime snacks are hard to digest and can disturb your stomach. Try intermittent fasting by skipping your dinner. This will help you regulate your hormones, boost your energy level, and help you lose fat.

Relax on your terms

Do you have a movie or a song that is a guilty pleasure for you? Perfect. Do anything you feel like doing.

Control stress

Find time to connect with your inner self. Meditation and yoga can help you get rid of the daily stress and feel spiritually balanced.

Prepare your bedroom

Sometimes the room conditions can affect your mood and fatigue symptoms. Make sure the levels of humidity and temperature in the room are not too high. Cleaning your room and getting rid of the unnecessary objects can also make you feel accomplished and relieved.

Remove toxic energy

Yes, this sounds cliché, but toxicity can be found in some people too. Don’t give away your energy on people that don’t deserve it and put you in the wrong frame of mind.

Manage your expectations

Don’t be disappointed if your energy levels get beyond your control. Fighting PsA is a serious battle and it is okay not to feel good and positive all the time.

Of course, what works for one, might not work for another. We all know our limitations and we are all different.

How do you manage symptoms of fatigue caused by psoriatic arthritis? Tell us about your experience in the comments below, or share your story with the community.

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Psoriatic-Arthritis.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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