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Integrative medicine for PsA

Hi all.my 18 yr daughter has just been diagnosed with PsA. The medical treatments sound hectic. Methotrexate etc are forms of chemotherapy. I am wondering if people have had success with alternate forms of healing and if we should try these first before going onto the hard stuff.

  1. Hi! , welcome to the community 😀 I know medical treatment can always be a little scary and stressful, especially when trying to find the right ones. first and foremost I'd suggest talking with your doctors about this if possible, they may have some more insight on what will help your daughter. second, I'm linking a few articles that I think you could find useful! if you have any more questions or thoughts please don't hesitate to reach out! The PsA community is here for you and your daughter <3 - Abigail, Team Member
    https://psoriatic-arthritis.com/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapy
    https://psoriatic-arthritis.com/living/exploring-complementary-and-alternative-therapies
    https://psoriatic-arthritis.com/managing-symptoms-naturally

    1. Yes, the treatments for PsA sound scary, and there are always potential adverse side effects from any kind of therapy. Methotrexate, which is almost always the first drug introduced as treatment for PsA, is quite effective for many sufferers of PsA for a reasonably long period time before ever having to move on to other DMARDs (like biologics). The side effects of Methotrexate may seem scary. But, they are well known, and doctors will have regular labs done to keep an eye on liver enzymes and other signs of potential adverse effects. Additionally, folic acid can be prescribed, or bought OTC, since most people taking Methotrexate will need this. Now, the adverse effects of going without proper treatment of PsA are permanent joint damage; excruciating pain; depression; extreme fatigue; painful skin lesions; heart disease; lung disease; kidney disease; and the list goes on. Successful treatment early on is the key to arresting flares and slowing disease progression. As for alternative forms of healing, nope. Alcohol and tobacco cessation, if this applies, eating a wholesome low sugar diet rich in plants, lean protein, and calcium (there is a growing body of evidence that rheumatoid diseases can deplete calcium levels), and plenty of exercise are all keys to ensuring good health. But your daughter is going to need the appropriate medications suggested and prescribed by her rheumatologist. They may sound hectic, but the alternative is a lifetime of pain. Started early enough, these drugs can induce long periods of disease remission.

      1. Thank you so much. I really appreciate you taking time.to respond
        .you make a lot of sense

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