Psoriatic arthritis and gluten

Psoriatic Arthritis and Gluten

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, up to 25% of people who have psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis are sensitive to gluten. Gluten increases inflammation in their skin, joints, gut, and more. Personally, I never gave gluten any consideration when thinking of ways to combat inflammation. That is until six months ago when my doctors and I were trying to figure out some unrelated bowel issues and discovered that gluten is not my friend.

It began with a low FODMAP diet

I began by strictly following a Low FODMAP Diet. In addition to the list of approved foods provided by my doctor, I also googled FODMAP diets for a larger look at what I should or shouldn’t eat. After five weeks I began to reintroduce certain foods back into my daily diet. While most of the foods didn’t necessarily present an issue when reintroduced, I had lost the desire to eat many of them. Too bad my desire for bread wasn’t one of those!! Bread and other products containing gluten proved to be a major player in regards to inflammation. While not the cause of my abdominal bloating and pain, it increased both. But it wasn’t just my belly in which a difference was noted. The joints in my hands, knees, and feet are considerably less swollen when I remain gluten-free.

Reducing gluten has made a difference

Following a gluten-free diet or greatly reducing the amount of gluten I eat has made a difference. In fact, it has made enough of a difference that I make an effort to avoid gluten as much as possible. I still occasionally allow myself foods with gluten, but never for multiple days in a row. I have also become very picky about which foods I permit. If I am going to have a piece of cake, it better be a darn good piece of cake!

Are you sensitive to gluten? Do you follow a gluten-free diet? If so, what is one of your favorite gluten-free foods? One my favorites is Annie’s Cocoa Bunnies Cereal.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Psoriatic-Arthritis.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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