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When Comfort Trumps Being Fashionable

In my life prior to living with chronic pain, I looked forward to getting dressed every day. I not only enjoyed putting together fashionable outfits, I delighted in picking out shoes and accessories that would make them “pop.” I loved prancing around in high heels and wearing jewelry.

Since becoming chronically ill, I now spend most of my time in pajamas or loungewear. While I still enjoy putting fun outfits together, I dread dressing for days that I plan to spend away from home. Now I focus on comfort.

Footwear comfort and foot pain

The pain I experience from psoriatic arthritis is what mostly forced a change in what I am comfortable wearing. The pain it creates in my feet is maddening. Because of this, I am no longer able to wear high heels. I also struggle with finding flat shoes that don’t increase my pain level and sneakers make my feet feel like they are being strangled.

Style versus comfort

Instead of having stylish shoes for every occasion or outing, my closet is filled with flip flops, Crocs, and wide width fuzzy or leather boots. This isn’t a problem during warmer months as I have tons of sparkly or cute sandals that can be paired with casual or formal clothing. Colder months are more challenging. I’ve had to make changes to my winter wardrobe by making sure all my outfits are boot friendly. This makes dressing for formal occasions more challenging.

Not caring about others opinions about my fashion choices

As much as I would love to purchase and wear shoes based upon how they look, my comfort trumps being fashionable. People can make fun of my Crocs and UGGs all they want. Their approval of my footwear isn’t as important as my comfort. I’d rather take a ribbing for my choice in footwear than spend days or weeks crying from an agonizing increase of pain.

Are you able to wear the same style of shoes that you wore before being diagnosed? If not, what changes did you make and what are your favorite shoes?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Psoriatic-Arthritis.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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